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Understanding the Direct Tools of RBI Reserve Bank of India

Understanding the Direct Tools of RBI Reserve Bank of India

Introduction

The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) plays a vital role in the economy of India. One of its important functions is regulating the money supply in the country.

To achieve this, the Reserve bank of India uses various tools, including direct and indirect tools. In this knowledge center, we will focus on the direct tools of Reserve bank of India and explain how they impact the economy in simple terms.

Cash Reserve Ratio (CRR)

The Cash Reserve Ratio (CRR) is a direct tool use by the Reserve bank of India to control the money supply. It is the percentage of total deposits that banks are require to keep with the RBI in the form of cash.

When the Reserve bank of India increases the CRR, banks have to keep more money with them, which reduces the amount of money banks can lend to borrowers. This helps in reducing the money supply in the economy, controlling inflation, and stabilizing the economy. Conversely, when the Reserve bank of India decreases the CRR, banks can lend more, boosting economic activity.

Statutory Liquidity Ratio (SLR)

The Statutory Liquidity Ratio (SLR) is another direct tool employed by the RBI. It that banks must maintain a certain percentage of their net demand and time liabilities in the form of government securities, gold, and other approved securities.

By adjusting the SLR, the RBI can influence the liquidity in the banking system. When the SLR is raised, banks have to hold more of their funds in liquid assets, reducing their ability to lend. Conversely, lowering the SLR frees up funds, encouraging banks to lend more, thereby affecting economic activity.

Bank Rate

The Bank Rate is the interest rate at which the RBI lends money to commercial banks. When the RBI raises the Bank Rate, it becomes more expensive for banks to borrow money from the RBI.

This, in turn, increases the interest rates that banks charge their customers for loans, such as home loans and personal loans. Higher interest rates discourage borrowing and spending, reducing the money supply and controlling inflation. Conversely, when the reserve bank of India  lowers the Bank Rate, it becomes cheaper for banks to borrow, leading to lower interest rates for borrowers and stimulating economic activity.

Repo Rate

The Repo Rate is the rate at which banks borrow money from the Reserve bank of India by selling government securities. When the Reserve bank of India raises the Repo Rate, borrowing from the Reserve bank of India becomes costlier for banks, which, in turn, leads to higher interest rates in the market.

This discourages borrowing and spending by consumers and businesses, reducing the money supply. Lowering the Repo Rate has the opposite effect, making borrowing cheaper and encouraging economic growth.

Reverse Repo Rate

The Reverse Repo Rate is the rate at which banks park their excess funds with the RBI by buying government securities. When the Reserve bank of India raises the Reverse Repo Rate, it becomes more attractive for banks to park their funds with the central bank, reducing the funds available for lending.

This helps in the banking system. Lowering the Reverse Repo Rate has the opposite effect, encouraging banks to lend more and stimulate economic activity.

Conclusion In conclusion, the Reserve Bank of India employs various direct tools like CRR, SLR, Bank Rate, Repo Rate, and Reverse Repo Rate to regulate the money supply and manage the Indian economy.

These tools play a crucial role in controlling inflation, encouraging economic growth, and maintaining stability in the financial system. Understanding these tools helps us comprehend the RBI’s role in shaping India’s economic landscape.

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